Saint Matthew – Chapter 21

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 21 1 1 When they drew near Jerusalem and came to Bethphage 2 on the Mount of Olives, Jesus sent two disciples, 2 saying to them, “Go into the village opposite… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 21

Saint Matthew – Chapter 17

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 17 1 1 2 After six days Jesus took Peter, James, and John his brother, and led them up a high mountain by themselves. 2 3 And he was transfigured before… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 17

The Bible – New Testament

Saint Matthew

Chapter 9

1

1 He entered a boat, made the crossing, and came into his own town.

2

And there people brought to him a paralytic lying on a stretcher. When Jesus saw their faith, he said to the paralytic, “Courage, child, your sins are forgiven.”

3

At that, some of the scribes 2 said to themselves, “This man is blaspheming.”

4

Jesus knew what they were thinking, and said, “Why do you harbor evil thoughts?

5

Which is easier, to say, ‘Your sins are forgiven,’ or to say, ‘Rise and walk’?

6

3 But that you may know that the Son of Man has authority on earth to forgive sins”  – he then said to the paralytic, “Rise, pick up your stretcher, and go home.”

7

He rose and went home.

8

4 When the crowds saw this they were struck with awe and glorified God who had given such authority to human beings.

9

5 6 As Jesus passed on from there, he saw a man named Matthew sitting at the customs post. He said to him, “Follow me.” And he got up and followed him.

10

While he was at table in his house, 7 many tax collectors and sinners came and sat with Jesus and his disciples.

11

The Pharisees saw this and said to his disciples, “Why does your teacher 8 eat with tax collectors and sinners?”

12

He heard this and said, “Those who are well do not need a physician, but the sick do. 9

13

Go and learn the meaning of the words, ‘I desire mercy, not sacrifice.’ 10 I did not come to call the righteous but sinners.”

14

Then the disciples of John approached him and said, “Why do we and the Pharisees fast (much), but your disciples do not fast?”

15

Jesus answered them, “Can the wedding guests mourn as long as the bridegroom is with them? The days will come when the bridegroom is taken away from them, and then they will fast. 11

16

No one patches an old cloak with a piece of unshrunken cloth, 12 for its fullness pulls away from the cloak and the tear gets worse.

17

People do not put new wine into old wineskins. Otherwise the skins burst, the wine spills out, and the skins are ruined. Rather, they pour new wine into fresh wineskins, and both are preserved.”

18

13 While he was saying these things to them, an official 14 came forward, knelt down before him, and said, “My daughter has just died. But come, lay your hand on her, and she will live.”

19

Jesus rose and followed him, and so did his disciples.

20

A woman suffering hemorrhages for twelve years came up behind him and touched the tassel 15 on his cloak.

21

She said to herself, “If only I can touch his cloak, I shall be cured.”

22

Jesus turned around and saw her, and said, “Courage, daughter! Your faith has saved you.” And from that hour the woman was cured.

23

When Jesus arrived at the official’s house and saw the flute players and the crowd who were making a commotion,

24

he said, “Go away! The girl is not dead but sleeping.” 16 And they ridiculed him.

25

When the crowd was put out, he came and took her by the hand, and the little girl arose.

26

And news of this spread throughout all that land.

27

17 And as Jesus passed on from there, two blind men followed (him), crying out, “Son of David, 18 have pity on us!”

28

When he entered the house, the blind men approached him and Jesus said to them, “Do you believe that I can do this?” “Yes, Lord,” they said to him.

29

Then he touched their eyes and said, “Let it be done for you according to your faith.”

30

And their eyes were opened. Jesus warned them sternly, “See that no one knows about this.”

31

But they went out and spread word of him through all that land.

32

As they were going out, 19 a demoniac who could not speak was brought to him,

33

and when the demon was driven out the mute person spoke. The crowds were amazed and said, “Nothing like this has ever been seen in Israel.”

34

20 But the Pharisees said, “He drives out demons by the prince of demons.”

35

21 Jesus went around to all the towns and villages, teaching in their synagogues, proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom, and curing every disease and illness.

36

At the sight of the crowds, his heart was moved with pity for them because they were troubled and abandoned, 22 like sheep without a shepherd.

37

23 Then he said to his disciples, “The harvest is abundant but the laborers are few;

38

so ask the master of the harvest to send out laborers for his harvest.”

1 [1] His own town: Capernaum; see  Matthew 4:13.
2 [3] Scribes: see the note on ⇒ Mark 2:6. Matthew omits the reason given in the Marcan story for the charge of blasphemy: “Who but God alone can forgive sins?” (⇒ Mark 2:7).
3 [6] It is not clear whether “But that you may know . . . to forgive sins” is intended to be a continuation of the words of Jesus or a parenthetical comment of the evangelist to those who would hear or read this gospel. In any case, Matthew here follows the Marcan text.
4 [8] Who had given such authority to human beings: a significant difference from ⇒ Mark 2:12 (“They . . . glorified God, saying, “We have never seen anything like this’ “). Matthew’s extension to human beings of the authority to forgive sins points to the belief that such authority was being claimed by Matthew’s church.
5 [9-17] In this section the order is the same as that of ⇒ Mark 2:13-22.
6 [9] A man named Matthew: Mark names this tax collector Levi (⇒ Mark 2:14). No such name appears in the four lists of the twelve who were the closest companions of Jesus (⇒ Matthew 10:2-4; ⇒ Mark 3:16-19; ⇒ Luke 6:14-16; ⇒ Acts 1:13 [eleven, because of the defection of Judas Iscariot]), whereas all four list a Matthew, designated in ⇒ Matthew 10:3 as “the tax collector.” The evangelist may have changed the “Levi” of his source to Matthew so that this man, whose call is given special notice, like that of the first four disciples (⇒ Matthew 4:18-22), might be included among the twelve. Another reason for the change may be that the disciple Matthew was the source of traditions peculiar to the church for which the evangelist was writing.
7 [10] His house: it is not clear whether his refers to Jesus or Matthew. Tax collectors: see the note on ⇒ Matthew 5:46. Table association with such persons would cause ritual impurity.
8 [11] Teacher: see the note on ⇒ Matthew 8:19.
9 [12] See the note on ⇒ Mark 2:17.
10 [13] Go and learn . . . not sacrifice: Matthew adds the prophetic statement of ⇒ Hosea 6:6 to the Marcan account (see also ⇒ Matthew 12:7). If mercy is superior to the temple sacrifices, how much more to the laws of ritual impurity.
11 [15] Fasting is a sign of mourning and would be as inappropriate at this time of joy, when Jesus is proclaiming the kingdom, as it would be at a marriage feast. Yet the saying looks forward to the time when Jesus will no longer be with the disciples visibly, the time of Matthew’s church. Then they will fast: see Didache 8:1.
12 [16-17] Each of these parables speaks of the unsuitability of attempting to combine the old and the new. Jesus’ teaching is not a patching up of Judaism, nor can the gospel be contained within the limits of Mosaic law.
13 [18-34] In this third group of miracles, the first (⇒ Matthew 9:18-26) is clearly dependent on Mark (⇒ Mark 5:21-43). Though it tells of two miracles, the cure of the woman had already been included within the story of the raising of the official’s daughter, so that the two were probably regarded as a single unit. The other miracles seem to have been derived from Mark and Q respectively, though there Matthew’s own editing is much more evident.
14 [18] Official: literally, “ruler.” Mark calls him “one of the synagogue officials” (⇒ Mark 5:22). My daughter has just died: Matthew heightens the Marcan “my daughter is at the point of death” (⇒ Mark 5:23).
15 [20] Tassel: possibly “fringe.” The Mosaic law prescribed that tassels be worn on the corners of one’s garment as a reminder to keep the commandments (see ⇒ Numbers 15:37-39; ⇒ Deut 22:12).
16 [24] Sleeping: sleep is a biblical metaphor for death (see ⇒ Psalm 87:6 LXX; ⇒ Daniel 12:2; ⇒ 1 Thes 5:10). Jesus’ statement is not a denial of the child’s real death, but an assurance that she will be roused from her sleep of death.
17 [27-31] This story was probably composed by Matthew out of Mark’s story of the healing of a blind man named Bartimaeus (⇒ Mark 10:46-52). Mark places the event late in Jesus’ ministry, just before his entrance into Jerusalem, and Matthew has followed his Marcan source at that point in his gospel also (see ⇒ Matthew 20:29-34). In each of the Matthean stories the single blind man of Mark becomes two. The reason why Matthew would have given a double version of the Marcan story and placed the earlier one here may be that he wished to add a story of Jesus’ curing the blind at this point in order to prepare for Jesus’ answer to the emissaries of the Baptist (⇒ Matthew 11:4-6) in which Jesus, recounting his works, begins with his giving sight to the blind.
18 [27] Son of David: this messianic title is connected once with the healing power of Jesus in Mark (⇒ Mark 10:47-48) and Luke (⇒ Luke 18:38-39) but more frequently in Matthew (see also ⇒ Matthew 12:23; ⇒ 15:22; ⇒ 20:30-31).
19 [32-34] The source of this story seems to be Q (see ⇒ Luke 11:14-15). As in the preceding healing of the blind, Matthew has two versions of this healing, the later in ⇒ Matthew 12:22-24 and the earlier here.
20 [34] This spiteful accusation foreshadows the growing opposition to Jesus in Matthew 11; 12.
21 [35] See the notes on ⇒ Matthew 4:23-25; ⇒ Matthew 8:1-⇒ 9:38.
22 [36] See ⇒ Mark 6:34; ⇒ Numbers 27:17; ⇒ 1 Kings 22:17.
23 [37-38] This Q saying (see ⇒ Luke 10:2) is only imperfectly related to this context. It presupposes that only God (the master of the harvest) can take the initiative in sending out preachers of the gospel, whereas in Matthew’s setting it leads into Matthew 10 where Jesus does so.

Index

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

The Bible – New Testament

Saint Matthew

Index

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

17. 18. 19. 2021. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Amanecer-2-X

Amanecer-2-X

Chapter 4

1

1 Then Jesus was led by the Spirit into the desert to be tempted by the devil.

2

He fasted for forty days and forty nights, 2 and afterwards he was hungry.

3

The tempter approached and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, command that these stones become loaves of bread.”

4

3 He said in reply, “It is written: ‘One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes forth from the mouth of God.'”

5

4 Then the devil took him to the holy city, and made him stand on the parapet of the temple,

6

and said to him, “If you are the Son of God, throw yourself down. For it is written: ‘He will command his angels concerning you and ‘with their hands they will support you, lest you dash your foot against a stone.'”

7

Jesus answered him, “Again it is written, ‘You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test.'”

8

Then the devil took him up to a very high mountain, and showed him all the kingdoms of the world in their magnificence,

9

and he said to him, “All these I shall give to you, if you will prostrate yourself and worship me.” 5

10

At this, Jesus said to him, “Get away, Satan! It is written: ‘The Lord, your God, shall you worship and him alone shall you serve.'”

11

Then the devil left him and, behold, angels came and ministered to him.

12

6 When he heard that John had been arrested, he withdrew to Galilee.

13

He left Nazareth and went to live in Capernaum by the sea, in the region of Zebulun and Naphtali,

14

that what had been said through Isaiah the prophet might be fulfilled:

15

“Land of Zebulun and land of Naphtali, the way to the sea, beyond the Jordan, Galilee of the Gentiles,

16

the people who sit in darkness have seen a great light, on those dwelling in a land overshadowed by death light has arisen.”

17

7 From that time on, Jesus began to preach and say, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand.”

18

8 As he was walking by the Sea of Galilee, he saw two brothers, Simon who is called Peter, and his brother Andrew, casting a net into the sea; they were fishermen.

19

He said to them, “Come after me, and I will make you fishers of men.”

20

9 At once they left their nets and followed him.

21

He walked along from there and saw two other brothers, James, the son of Zebedee, and his brother John. They were in a boat, with their father Zebedee, mending their nets. He called them,

22

and immediately they left their boat and their father and followed him.

23

10 He went around all of Galilee, teaching in their synagogues, 11 proclaiming the gospel of the kingdom, and curing every disease and illness among the people.

24

12 His fame spread to all of Syria, and they brought to him all who were sick with various diseases and racked with pain, those who were possessed, lunatics, and paralytics, and he cured them.

25

And great crowds from Galilee, the Decapolis, 13 Jerusalem, and Judea, and from beyond the Jordan followed him.

Amanecer-2-X
1 [1-11] Jesus, proclaimed Son of God at his baptism, is subjected to a triple temptation. Obedience to the Father is a characteristic of true sonship, and Jesus is tempted by the devil to rebel against God, overtly in the third case, more subtly in the first two. Each refusal of Jesus is expressed in language taken from the Book of Deuteronomy (⇒ Deut 8:3; ⇒ 6:13, ⇒ 16). The testings of Jesus resemble those of Israel during the wandering in the desert and later in Canaan, and the victory of Jesus, the true Israel and the true Son, contrasts with the failure of the ancient and disobedient “son,” the old Israel. In the temptation account Matthew is almost identical with Luke; both seem to have drawn upon the same source.
2 [2] Forty days and forty nights: the same time as that during which Moses remained on Sinai (⇒ Exodus 24:18). The time reference, however, seems primarily intended to recall the forty years during which Israel was tempted in the desert (⇒ Deut 8:2).
3 [4] Cf ⇒ Deut 8:3. Jesus refuses to use his power for his own benefit and accepts whatever God wills.
4 [5-7] The devil supports his proposal by an appeal to the scriptures, ⇒ Psalm 91:11a, ⇒ 12. Unlike Israel (⇒ Deut 6:16), Jesus refuses to “test” God by demanding from him an extraordinary show of power.
5 [9] The worship of Satan to which Jesus is tempted is probably intended to recall Israel’s worship of false gods. His refusal is expressed in the words of ⇒ Deut 6:13.
6 [12-17] Isaiah’s prophecy of the light rising upon Zebulun and Naphtali (Isaiah 8:22-⇒ 9:1) is fulfilled in Jesus’ residence at Capernaum. The territory of these two tribes was the first to be devastated (733-32 B.C.) at the time of the Assyrian invasion. In order to accommodate Jesus’ move to Capernaum to the prophecy, Matthew speaks of that town as being “in the region of Zebulun and Naphtali” (⇒ Matthew 4:13), whereas it was only in the territory of the latter, and he understands the sea of the prophecy, the Mediterranean, as the sea of Galilee.
7 [17] At the beginning of his preaching Jesus takes up the words of John the Baptist (⇒ Matthew 3:2) although with a different meaning; in his ministry the kingdom of heaven has already begun to be present (⇒ Matthew 12:28).
8 [18-22] The call of the first disciples promises them a share in Jesus’ work and entails abandonment of family and former way of life. Three of the four, Simon, James, and John, are distinguished among the disciples by a closer relation with Jesus (⇒ Matthew 17:1; ⇒ 26:37).
9 [20] Here and in ⇒ Matthew 4:22, as in Mark (⇒ Mark 1:16-20) and unlike the Lucan account (⇒ Luke 5:1-11), the disciples’ response is motivated only by Jesus’ invitation, an element that emphasizes his mysterious power.
10 [23-25] This summary of Jesus’ ministry concludes the narrative part of the first book of Matthew’s gospel (Matthew 3-4). The activities of his ministry are teaching, proclaiming the gospel, and healing; cf ⇒ Matthew 9:35.
11 [23] Their synagogues: Matthew usually designates the Jewish synagogues as their synagogue(s) (⇒ Matthew 9:35; ⇒ 10:17; ⇒ 12:9; ⇒ 13:54) or, in address to Jews, your synagogues (⇒ Matthew 23:34), an indication that he wrote after the break between church and synagogue.
12 [24] Syria: the Roman province to which Palestine belonged.
13 [25] The Decapolis: a federation of Greek cities in Palestine, originally ten in number, all but one east of the Jordan.
Amanecer-2-X

Index

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Amanecer-2-X

 

The Bible – New Testament

Saint Matthew

Index

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

17. 18. 19. 2021. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Chapter 8

1

1 When Jesus came down from the mountain, great crowds followed him.

2

And then a leper 2 approached, did him homage, and said, “Lord, if you wish, you can make me clean.”

3

He stretched out his hand, touched him, and said, “I will do it. Be made clean.” His leprosy was cleansed immediately.

4

3 Then Jesus said to him, “See that you tell no one, but go show yourself to the priest, and offer the gift that Moses prescribed; that will be proof for them.”

5

4 When he entered Capernaum, 5 a centurion approached him and appealed to him,

6

saying, “Lord, my servant is lying at home paralyzed, suffering dreadfully.”

7

He said to him, “I will come and cure him.”

8

The centurion said in reply, 6 “Lord, I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof; only say the word and my servant will be healed.

9

For I too am a person subject to authority, with soldiers subject to me. And I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and to another, ‘Come here,’ and he comes; and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.”

10

When Jesus heard this, he was amazed and said to those following him, “Amen, I say to you, in no one in Israel 7 have I found such faith.

11

I say to you, 8 many will come from the east and the west, and will recline with Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob at the banquet in the kingdom of heaven,

12

but the children of the kingdom will be driven out into the outer darkness, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.”

13

And Jesus said to the centurion, “You may go; as you have believed, let it be done for you.” And at that very hour (his) servant was healed.

14

9 Jesus entered the house of Peter, and saw his mother-in-law lying in bed with a fever.

15

He touched her hand, the fever left her, and she rose and waited on him.

16

When it was evening, they brought him many who were possessed by demons, and he drove out the spirits by a word 10 and cured all the sick,

17

to fulfill what had been said by Isaiah the prophet: 11 “He took away our infirmities and bore our diseases.”

18

12 13 When Jesus saw a crowd around him, he gave orders to cross to the other side.

19

A scribe approached and said to him, “Teacher, 14 I will follow you wherever you go.”

20

Jesus answered him, “Foxes have dens and birds of the sky have nests, but the Son of Man 15 has nowhere to rest his head.”

21

Another of (his) disciples said to him, “Lord, let me go first and bury my father.”

22

16 But Jesus answered him, “Follow me, and let the dead bury their dead.”

23

17 He got into a boat and his disciples followed him.

24

Suddenly a violent storm 18 came up on the sea, so that the boat was being swamped by waves; but he was asleep.

25

They came and woke him, saying, “Lord, save us! 19 We are perishing!”

26

He said to them, “Why are you terrified, O you of little faith?” 20 Then he got up, rebuked the winds and the sea, and there was great calm.

27

The men were amazed and said, “What sort of man is this, whom even the winds and the sea obey?”

28

When he came to the other side, to the territory of the Gadarenes, 21 two demoniacs who were coming from the tombs met him. They were so savage that no one could travel by that road.

29

They cried out, “What have you to do with us, 22 Son of God? Have you come here to torment us before the appointed time?”

30

Some distance away a herd of many swine was feeding. 23

31

The demons pleaded with him, “If you drive us out, send us into the herd of swine.”

32

And he said to them, “Go then!” They came out and entered the swine, and the whole herd rushed down the steep bank into the sea where they drowned.

33

The swineherds ran away, and when they came to the town they reported everything, including what had happened to the demoniacs.

34

Thereupon the whole town came out to meet Jesus, and when they saw him they begged him to leave their district.

1 [⇒ 8:1-⇒ 9:38] This narrative section of the second book of the gospel is composed of nine miracle stories, most of which are found in Mark, although Matthew does not follow the Marcan order and abbreviates the stories radically. The stories are arranged in three groups of three, each group followed by a section composed principally of sayings of Jesus about discipleship. ⇒ Matthew 9:35 is an almost verbatim repetition of ⇒ Matthew 4:23. Each speaks of Jesus’ teaching, preaching, and healing. The teaching and preaching form the content of Matthew 5-7; the healing, that of Matthew 8-9. Some scholars speak of a portrayal of Jesus as “Messiah of the Word” in Matthew 5-7 and “Messiah of the Deed” in Matthew 8-9. That is accurate so far as it goes, but there is also a strong emphasis on discipleship in Matthew 8-9; these chapters have not only christological but ecclesiological import.

2 [2] A leper: see the note on ⇒ Mark 1:40.

3 [4] Cf ⇒ Lev 14:2-9. That will be proof for them: the Greek can also mean “that will be proof against them.” It is not clear whether them refers to the priests or the people.
4 [5-13] This story comes from Q (see ⇒ Luke 7:1-10) and is also reflected in ⇒ John 4:46-54. The similarity between the Q story and the Johannine is due to a common oral tradition, not to a common literary source. As in the later story of the daughter of the Canaanite woman (⇒ Matthew 15:21-28) Jesus here breaks with his usual procedure of ministering only to Israelites and anticipates the mission to the Gentiles.
5 [5] A centurion: a military officer commanding a hundred men. He was probably in the service of Herod Antipas, tetrarch of Galilee; see the note on ⇒ Matthew 14:1.
6 [8-9] Acquainted by his position with the force of a command, the centurion expresses faith in the power of Jesus’ mere word.
7 [10] In no one in Israel: there is good textual attestation (e.g., Codex Sinaiticus) for a reading identical with that of ⇒ Luke 7:9, “not even in Israel.” But that seems to be due to a harmonization of Matthew with Luke.
8 [11-12] Matthew inserts into the story a Q saying (see ⇒ Luke 13:28-29) about the entrance of Gentiles into the kingdom and the exclusion of those Israelites who, though descended from the patriarchs and members of the chosen nation (the children of the kingdom), refused to believe in Jesus. There will be wailing and grinding of teeth: the first occurrence of a phrase used frequently in this gospel to describe final condemnation (⇒ Matthew 13:42, ⇒ 50; ⇒ 22:13; ⇒ 24:51; ⇒ 25:30). It is found elsewhere in the New Testament only in ⇒ Luke 13:28.
9 [14-15] Cf ⇒ Mark 1:29-31. Unlike Mark, Matthew has no implied request by others for the woman’s cure. Jesus acts on his own initiative, and the cured woman rises and waits not on “them” (⇒ Mark 1:31) but on him.
10 [16] By a word: a Matthean addition to ⇒ Mark 1:34; cf ⇒ 8:8.
11 [17] This fulfillment citation from ⇒ Isaiah 53:4 follows the MT, not the LXX. The prophet speaks of the Servant of the Lord who suffers vicariously for the sins (“infirmities”) of others; Matthew takes the infirmities as physical afflictions.
12 [18-22] This passage between the first and second series of miracles about following Jesus is taken from Q (see ⇒ Luke 9:57-62). The third of the three sayings found in the source is absent from Matthew.
13 [18] The other side: i.e., of the Sea of Galilee.
14 [19] Teacher: for Matthew, this designation of Jesus is true, for he has Jesus using it of himself (⇒ Matthew 10:24, ⇒ 25; ⇒ 23:8; ⇒ 26:18), yet when it is used of him by others they are either his opponents (⇒ Matthew 9:11; ⇒ 12:38; ⇒ 17:24; ⇒ 22:16, ⇒ 24, ⇒ 36) or, as here and in ⇒ Matthew 19:16, well-disposed persons who cannot see more deeply. Thus it reveals an inadequate recognition of who Jesus is.
15 [20] Son of Man: see the note on ⇒ Mark 8:31. This is the first occurrence in Matthew of a term that appears in the New Testament only in sayings of Jesus, except for ⇒ Acts 7:56 and possibly ⇒ Matthew 9:6 (⇒ Mark 2:10; ⇒ Luke 5:24). In Matthew it refers to Jesus in his ministry (seven times, as here), in his passion and resurrection (nine times, e.g., ⇒ Matthew 17:22), and in his glorious coming at the end of the age (thirteen times, e.g., ⇒ Matthew 24:30).
16 [22] Let the dead bury their dead: the demand of Jesus overrides what both the Jewish and the Hellenistic world regarded as a filial obligation of the highest importance. See the note on ⇒ Luke 9:60.
17 [23] His disciples followed him: the first miracle in the second group (⇒ Matthew 8:23-⇒ 9:8) is introduced by a verse that links it with the preceding sayings by the catchword “follow.” In Mark the initiative in entering the boat is taken by the disciples (⇒ Mark 4:35-41); here, Jesus enters first and the disciples follow.
18 [24] Storm: literally, “earthquake,” a word commonly used in apocalyptic literature for the shaking of the old world when God brings in his kingdom. All the synoptics use it in depicting the events preceding the parousia of the Son of Man (⇒ Matthew 24:7; ⇒ Mark 13:8; ⇒ Luke 21:11). Matthew has introduced it here and in his account of the death and resurrection of Jesus (⇒ Matthew 27:51-54; ⇒ 28:2).
19 [25] The reverent plea of the disciples contrasts sharply with their reproach of Jesus in ⇒ Mark 4:38.
20 [26] You of little faith: see the note on ⇒ Matthew 6:30. Great calm: Jesus’ calming the sea may be meant to recall the Old Testament theme of God’s control over the chaotic waters (⇒ Psalm 65:8; ⇒ 89:10; ⇒ 93:3-4; ⇒ 107:29).
21 [28] Gadarenes: this is the reading of Codex Vaticanus, supported by other important textual witnesses. The original reading of Codex Sinaiticus was Gazarenes, later changed to Gergesenes, and a few versions have Gerasenes. Each of these readings points to a different territory connected, respectively, with the cities Gadara, Gergesa, and Gerasa (modern Jerash). There is the same confusion of readings in the parallel texts, ⇒ Mark 5:1 and ⇒ Luke 8:26; there the best reading seems to be “Gerasenes,” whereas “Gadarenes” is probably the original reading in Matthew. The town of Gadara was about five miles southeast of the Sea of Galilee, and Josephus (Life 9:42) refers to it as possessing territory that lay on that sea. Two demoniacs: Mark (5:1-20) has one.
22 [29] What have you to do with us?: see the note on ⇒ John 2:4. Before the appointed time: the notion that evil spirits were allowed by God to afflict human beings until the time of the final judgment is found in Enoch 16:1 and Jubilees 10:7-10.
23 [30] The tending of pigs, animals considered unclean by Mosaic law (⇒ Lev 11:6-7), indicates that the population was Gentile.

Index

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11.

12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.

Saint Matthew – Chapter 24

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew  Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 24 1 1 Jesus left the temple area and was going away, when his disciples approached him to point out the temple buildings. 2 2 He said to them in… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 24

Saint Matthew – Chapter 25

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew  Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 25 1 1 “Then 2 the kingdom of heaven will be like ten virgins who took their lamps and went out to meet the bridegroom. 2 3 Five of them were foolish… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 25

Saint Matthew – Chapter 23

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew  Index  1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 23 1 1 Then Jesus spoke to the crowds and to his disciples, 2 2 saying, “The scribes and the Pharisees have taken their seat on the chair of Moses.… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 23

Saint Matthew – Chapter 28

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 28 1 1 After the sabbath, as the first day of the week was dawning, 2 Mary Magdalene and the other Mary came to see the tomb. 2 3 And behold, there… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 28

Saint Matthew – Chapter 27

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew  Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 27 1 1 2 When it was morning, all the chief priests and the elders of the people took counsel against Jesus to put him to death. 2 They bound… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 27

Saint Matthew – Chapter 26

The Bible – New Testament Saint Matthew  Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. Chapter 26 1 1 When Jesus finished all these words, 2 he said to his disciples, 2 “You know that in two days’ time it will be Passover, and the Son of… Continue reading Saint Matthew – Chapter 26